Exit Alarms Library Update

We have updated the Exit Alarms page in the Library using our new format.  We have new literature and manuals for the following manufacturers:

  • Alarm Lock Systems Inc.
  • Arrow Lock & Door Hardware
  • Detex Corporation
  • Positive Lock, Inc.
  • SARGENT Manufacturing Company
  • Security Door Controls (SDC)

We have also included a link to Detex’s Training and Support Videos. Detex has produced and hosted dozens of videos covering the application, installation, and servicing of their products. It’s a very comprehensive and valuable training resource.
Next Monday we will publish the first article in a multi-article series covering all things exit alarms.

By |2020-03-05T09:00:48+00:00March 5th, 2020|All, Exit Alarms, Library Update|0 Comments

How Yale's Large Format Interchangeable Core Works

Yale Large Format Interchangeable Core History

Yale began producing their proprietary interchangeable core format, commonly called Yale LFIC, in 1960. They would receive a patent for this core in November of 1961. In the book The Core of the Matter, AJ Hoffman mentions that Yale also offered an Oval-shaped removable core around this time. They eventually settled on offering their current figure-8 shaped core, which is still manufactured today. A high security version, called the Yale Security, was introduced in 1989.

Yale Large Format Interchangeable Core

Yale Large Format Interchangeable Core


Medeco was allowed to produce a large format core to retrofit into existing Yale LFIC housings while Yale’s patent was still active. Medeco’s core became their 31 Series, which they still produce. Both the Yale LFIC and the Medeco 31 Series, in terms of size, shape, and dimensions, are identical – the only difference is that Medeco’s 31 Series utilizes their angled pin and sidebar designs. 

Yale Large Format Interchangeable Core Function

Similar to Schlage’s Full Size Interchangeable Cores, Yale’s LFIC doesn’t use multiple shearlines and relies on a control lug at the rear of the core that is actuated by a control blank. To remove the core, the user:

  1. Inserts the control key
  2. Rotates the control key clockwise about 20 degrees to retract the control lug
  3. Removes the core from the housing.

Yale LFICs are available in 6 and 7-pin formats. 5-pin cores were offered for a time but they have since been discontinued. If a user has a 5-pin system and are trying to incorporate Yale LFICs, they would need to order 6-pin formats and leave the 6th chamber empty. 
For 5-pin cores, the control key must be 6 spaces, or pins, long. For 6-pin cores, the number becomes 7. In either case, the depth of the “control cut” is #1, no matter the key bitting specification you are using. A #1 cut at the tip creates a potential problem for existing master key systems that didn’t plan for interchangeable core integration due to MACS, or maximum adjacent cut specification. MACS can prevent a possible control key because the adjacent cut can be so deep that it starts to remove material from the tip of the key. This is relatively rare, but it bares mention. 
Yale LFICs can be used with .019” and .025” key bitting specifications. The .025” key bitting specification is no longer used for new factory systems, however. 

Yale Large Format Interchangeable Core Servicing

For decades Yale LFICs didn’t allow for top loading. In order to pin a core, the locksmith had to remove the plug, load the pins, and reassemble. After January 2002, Yale redesigned the cores for top loading via a capping strip. Since this redesign, there should be no need to disassemble the cores for pinning and basic servicing. If disassembly is required, however, care must exercised when removing the plug without a key due to it’s groove; the top pins could potentially enter this groove, locking up the core. This can be prevented with a shim during the disassembly and reassembly process.

Yale LFIC Control Lug

Yale LFIC Control Lug


Special attention should be paid to the screw holding the control lug. It can be over-tightened and, if so, bind against the control lug, potentially damaging the control pin and/or control key. This screw should be tightened snug but no more.
For more information, download Yale’s Cylinders and Keying Manual.
 

By |2020-03-02T09:00:29+00:00March 2nd, 2020|All, Cores and Cylinders|0 Comments

DIY Pin Kit

I Dropped a Pin Kit

A few weeks back I did the unthinkable: I dropped a pin kit. I’ve dropped pin kits before, don’t get me wrong, but never in my locksmith career have I had one spill out. Here is the aftermath:

Spilled Pin Kit

Spilled Pin Kit


You may notice that it wasn’t a “professional” pin kit made by LAB or even a lock manufacturer such as Sargent or Medeco. Guilty. We generally handle high-volume jobs (think hundreds of cylinders at a time) so we need large pin quantities for a specific brand or key bitting specification. A universal pin kit will almost never work for our jobs and lock manufacturers typically only offer kits with 50-100 pins per size/type. We’re odd balls so I wouldn’t expect a commercial product to suit our needs. As a result, we often have to make dedicated, DIY pin kits.
Prior to the mishap our pin kits were of the “tic-tac” plastic variety. They’re thin plastic containers with press fit covers. They do a great job of sorting and holding pins but if you drop one or rough it up it’ll show. Either way, I decided not to let this happen again and began searching for a better, more durable option. Here is what I found.

Plano Waterproof StowAway (3600 Series)

The day the pin kit disaster happened I immediately went shopping for a replacement for all of our kits. The first potential solution I saw was Plano’s Waterproof StowAway (3600 Series). For all intents and purposes, this is a tackle box; that’s what Plano specializes in after all. It features an o-ring seal around the perimeter as well as three tight-sealing cam-action latches. Both of these features will help ensure that pins don’t jostle around and work their way into other compartments, whether by dropping or just normally moving around. While plastic, the 3600 Series isn’t hard and brittle. In other words, if dropped from a reasonable distance this thing would stay shut and not crack. I’ll take it!

Plano Waterproof StowAway (3600 Series)

Plano Waterproof StowAway (3600 Series)


The 3600 Series features adjustable compartments, anywhere from 5 to 20 depending on how you wish to configure it. The more the merrier in my case because I can always load up spare compartments with springs or other parts. I maxed out each 3600 Series box and labeled them.
Plano 3600 Labeled

Plano 3600 Labeled


If you are curious, here are some of the pin kits I made:
Sargent Pin Kit

Sargent Pin Kit


Schlage Pin Kit

Schlage Pin Kit


I also made a kit for storing Medeco cams and tailpieces in my service vehicle:
Medeco Cam and Tailpiece Kit

Medeco Cam and Tailpiece Kit


The 3600 Series only drawback is it’s lack of compartments – 20 max. 20 compartments will cover most of our kits, such as Schlage’s Classic or Sargent’s .020″, but it isn’t large enough for a select few. There is just no conceivable way to make the 3600 Series support a Medeco key system or a Corbin Russwin interchangeable core variant without doubling or tripling the amount of boxes needed. That’s not practical. It also wouldn’t be practical to find a single box to accommodate every possible kit; that would leave many empty compartments in the smaller ones. I did find out that Plano offers (offered?) larger versions of the Waterproof StowAway but I could not find anyone that stocked them online or in-store. With all this in mind, I needed to find something comparable to the 3600 Series for the larger kits.

Plano Edge (3700 Series)

The Plano Edge 3700 Series shares a lot of qualities with the Waterproof StowAway 3600 Series. The 3700 Series too features an o-ring seal around the perimeter of the box. Rather than three latches, it has one oversized latch across the entire front of the box. I would have preferred the three cam-action latches like the 3600 Series had but the oversized latch is certainly better than a single, smaller one. The 3700 Series also features up to 34 adjustable compartments via very, very durable dividers with dove-tail locking.

Plano Edge (3700 Series)

Plano Edge (3700 Series)


One other great feature of the 3700 Series’ compartments is that the box has notches at the bottom of the box for each divider position. This design provides a secure and durable fit.
Plano 3600 Compartments

Plano 3600 Compartments


I quickly took advantage of the available compartments to handle our larger kits. Here are a few of those kits:
Medeco Original Pin Kit

Medeco Original Pin Kit


Sargent Interchangeable Core Pin Kit

Sargent Interchangeable Core Pin Kit


Yale .025" Pin Kit

Yale .025″ Pin Kit

Conclusion

Dedicated pin kits aren’t necessary for all but I’m sure many locksmiths will recognize their value under the right circumstances. If you do require a dedicated pin for a specific key bitting specification you will soon learn that the commercial versions aren’t sufficient for larger jobs or long term use without frequent refillings. Put simply, you’ll be in our situation. No worries, there are definitely quality options available to you, such as the 3600 and 3700 Series.
Constructing DIY pin kits won’t break the bank either. I paid ~$8 for each 3600 Series box and $24 for each 3700 Series box. The cost of pins are dependent on the type and where you are purchasing from but you’re paying for those no matter if it’s a DIY kit or if it is part of a commercially available kit. All told, the entire project cost around $300 but you can see the amount of kits that were involved.

All Pin Kits

All Pin Kits


Learn from my mistake and find something that is secure and durable. It took me 13 years to spill a pin kit but it did happen. I only wish I had the foresight to prepare for it!

By |2020-02-26T09:00:57+00:00February 26th, 2020|All|1 Comment

Patent-Protected Key Systems for 2020 and Beyond

An Introduction to Key Control 

In a perfect world we would never have to worry about lost keys or keys falling into the wrong hands. Unfortunately, we do not live in a perfect world, we live in the real world. The real world requires us to account for these scenarios if we wish to protect and maintain key systems. We account for these scenarios by practicing key control via patent-protected key systems.
Key control, as defined by Wikipedia, refers to various methods for making sure that certain keys are only used by authorized people. Perhaps the most important method, and the cornerstone to all effective key control, is the key control policy. Key control policies set forth rules and procedures for key systems. They generally cover areas such as the roles and responsibilities for those involved with the key system, key requests and issuance, record keeping and auditing, and maintenance tasks, such as rekeying. When done correctly a key control policy is the blueprint to successful key control. More important, successful key control protects a building, or buildings, and its occupants.

Patent-Protected Key Systems and Key Control

A key control policy’s effectiveness is greatly enhanced with a patent-protected key system. Via utility patents, the sale and distribution of key blanks carries federal law protection. This means protection against the unauthorized duplication of keys. Think about the implications of this from both sides, the locksmith and the end-user. The locksmith is able to offer a key that cannot be duplicated anywhere else and the end-user has the peace of mind that their keys cannot be duplicated without their authorization.  
Multiple factors come into consideration when selecting patent-protected key systems to offer to end-users. Things like buy-ins, annual minimum purchases, required servicing equipment, and availability must be evaluated. Rather than steer you in one direction I will simply present you with options. 
Before I begin discussing said options, I want to point out one very important factor of patent-protected key systems: each new calendar year means their utility patent is either expiring or is one year closer to expiring. While no patent-protected key systems are expiring this year, 2021 will mark the end of patent protection for Medeco’s M3 and Sargent’s XC platforms, barring no extensions. In 2022 and 2023 the same can be said for Arrow’s CHOicE and Kaba’s Peaks Global, respectively. With this in mind I have not included these platforms in the following list due to their shorter patent lives 

Patent-Protected Key Systems

Abloy Protec2

Abloy Protec2

Abloy Protec2


Abloy’s Protec2 platform is the latest in a long line disc-detainer designs that made Abloy famous. 11 discs within each cylinder allow for 1.97 billion theoretical key combinations and incredible pick resistance. While disc-detainer designs are known to rugged, Abloy took things a step further by incorporating its patented Anti Wear System (AWS) to prolong each cylinder’s life. Abloy also incorporated an interactive element into each key for added protection. The Protec2 platform is able to be integrated with CLIQ and its patent expires in 2031. 

BEST CORMAX 

BEST CORMAX

BEST CORMAX


Based on the SFIC format that BEST pioneered, CORMAX utilizes a patented side pin that engages a special slot at the tip of each key. With dozens of keyways broken into two different keyway families, or Series, CORMAX provides an upgrade path for existing BEST standard and MX8 keyways. Multi-milled keys are also available to create large master keying possibilities.  The BEST CORMAX patent expires in 2027. 

Corbin Russwin Access 3 

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Corbin Russwin’s Access 3 is actually 3 key platforms, each offering their own benefits and price point. AP, or the first level protection, offers key control. AS, the second level of protection, offers key control and additional bump and pick resistance. AHS, the third level of protection, adds drill protection onto the AS and comes with a UL437 certification. Each level is priced differently to assist with providing a solution at any price point. Access 3 is available to fit all existing Corbin Russwin cylinder types, including Corbin Russwin LFIC, and offers integrability with CLIQ. Its patent expires in 2027. 

Kaba Peaks Preferred 

Kaba Peaks Preferred

Kaba Peaks Preferred


Kaba’s Peaks Preferred uses a patented “Peaks pin” that interacts with a hollow milled key. This design is able to be configured into almost any cylinder or core format currently on the market. Peaks Preferred keys are able to be originated using most existing key machines. The Peaks Preferred patent expires in 2024. 

Medeco X4

Medeco X4

Medeco X4


Medeco’s X4 platform is the patented successor to the Medeco Keymark. As was the case with Keymark, X4 offers economic and efficient key control by offering cylinders and cores available to retrofit into almost any existing door hardware under a single keying system. Last year, Medeco was able to secure a 3 year extension to the X4 patent meaning that it will remain protected until 2030. 

Mul-T-Lock Integrator 

Mul-T-Lock Integrator

Mul-T-Lock Integrator


Mul-T-Lock’s Integrator platform builds on their 7X7 platform with enhanced tamper resistance and flexible master keying possibilities. It utilizes a 7-pin cylinder design that interacts with a patented key blank which uses an oval cut in 3 different configurations: internal, external, and twin. The Integrator is able to utilize Mul-T-Lock’s 3-in-1 keying option which allows you to rekey a cylinder up to 2 times by simply turning the key The Integrator patent expires in 2024. 

Mul-T-Lock Interactive+ 

Mul-T-Lock Interactive+

Mul-T-Lock Interactive+


Mul-T-Lock’s Interactive+ is the successor to the original Interactive platform. Using an interactive element on the key blade as well as a pin-in-pin dimple design, the Interactive+ platform is able to provide keys that are backwards compatible and will work with equivalent Interactive cylinders. The Interactive+ is able to utilize Mul-T-Lock’s 3-in-1 keying option which allows you to rekey a cylinder up to 2 times by simply turning the key. Interactive+ offers integrability with CLIQ and its patent expires in 2025. 

Mul-T-Lock MT5+ 

Mul-T-Lock MT5+

Mul-T-Lock MT5+


The MT5+ takes Mul-T-Lock’s traditional pin-in-pin design and adds finger pins that interact with a sidebar as well as an interactive element at the tip of the key. This design provides multiple layers of security and robust master keying possibilities. The MT5+ is able to utilize Mul-T-Lock’s 3-in-1 keying option which allows you to rekey a cylinder up to 2 times by simply turning the key. MT5+ offers integrability with CLIQ and its patent expires in 2025. 

Sargent Degree 

Sargent Degree CLIQ

Sargent Degree CLIQ


Sargent’s Degree platform is very similar to Corbin Russwin’s Access 3. Degree Level 1, or DG1, offers key control, Degree Level 2, or DG2, offers key control and additional bump and pick resistance, Degree Level 3, or DG3, adds drill protection onto DG2 and comes with a UL437 certification. Each level is priced differently to assist with providing a solution at any price point. Degree is available in mortise, rim, and KIK/KIL cylinder formats as well as Sargent’s 6300 LFIC format and offers integrability with CLIQ. Sargent Degree’s patent expires in 2027. 

Schlage Everest 29 

Schlage Everest 29

Schlage Everest 29


Schlage’s Everest 29 platform is the successor to the original Everest platform. In fact, Everest 29 keyways are backwards compatible with their Everest equivalent. Like the Everest, the Everest 29 utilizes a check pin that interfaces with an undercut groove on the key. You can duplicate and originate Everest 29 keys on any machine capable of cutting Schlage Classic keys. The Everest 29 patent expires in 2029. 

Schlage Primus XP 

Schlage Primus XP

Schlage Primus XP


Schlage’s Primus XP builds on the original Primus platform by adding a 7th finger pin position. Primus XP adds tremendous flexibility because it is compatible with all current and many legacy Schlage keyways, including Everest and Primus keyways. Like Everest 29, you can duplicate and originate Primus XP keys on any machine capable of cutting Schlage Classic keys. The Primus XP patent expires in 2024. If applied to an Everest 29 based key system, the Everest 29’s patent protection overrides the Primus XP patents for protection until 2029. 

Patent-Protection and Profit 

If you do not offer patented-protected key systems for your customers to assist with key control, now is the time. It’s a win-win for both sides. Patent-protected key systems are not only valuable from a security standpoint, they’re valuable to your bottom line. Selling and servicing patent-protected key systems creates a steady stream of income since the end-user is locked into your keyway(s). They have to come to you to service the system. Furthermore, it protects your accounts because your competition cannot obtain the materials necessary to service your accounts. Finally, there is tremendous profit. Patented cores/cylinders often times list for at least 4-5 times more than their generic counterpart. If your discount is less 50 on both, for example, it’s easy to see the substantial profit margins. To learn more about patent-protected key systems, please contact your local rep(s) or visit our High Security Library page.

By |2020-02-24T09:00:35+00:00February 24th, 2020|All, High Security, Keys|0 Comments

Original Schlage Primus Service Manual Added to Library


We have added what we believe is the original Schlage Primus Service Manual to our High Security page in the Library. This service manual, dated May 26, 1989, was released 10 months after the issuance of the eventual Schlage Primus patent. For more information about the Schlage Primus check out the other 2 service manuals on the High Security page or check out it’s LockWiki entry.


By |2020-01-30T09:00:35+00:00January 30th, 2020|All, High Security|0 Comments

How Schlage's Modular Cylinders Work

Introduction

In July of 2010, Schlage started transitioning their cylinders to a modular design. This design allowed one cylinder to be used as a key-in-lever/key-in-knob cylinder, or a rim cylinder, or a mortise cylinder, depending on the components used and their configuration.
Schlage Modular Cylinders
For example, instead of carrying 6 individual mortise cylinder lengths in a variety of finishes, you only need to have 1 cylinder with various rear and front housings. That means less costs, less overhead, less inventory; redundancy across keyways/key sections is essentially eliminated with the modular design.
The modular design also allows for field adjustments. Let’s say a customer has an area of their building renovated and they currently have modular cylinders. Let’s say they’re changing from a bright brass to satin chrome hardware. With the modular design, you would only need to change front housing on each cylinder and re-use their existing cylinders and potentially existing keys.
Schlage’s transition to the modular design lasted until February of 2011, when it became standard.



Schlage still sells non-modular cylinders and their components. There has to be hundreds of thousands of non-modular cylinders out there, if not more. It wouldn’t make much sense at all for them to simply stop supporting those products so Schlage still sells components to support non-modular cylinders and probably will be for quite some time.

Schlage Modular Components

Schlage Modular Cylinders
Multiple different components make up Schlage’s modular design:

  • Cylinder. The cylinders used for the modular design were new to Schlage. They are backwards compatible, so to speak, in that they can be used in hardware that pre-dates the modular design. The same cannot be said for key-in-knob/key-in-lever cylinders that predate the modular design; they cannot be used with other modular components. There are 2 reasons for this: one is a dimensional change to the cylinder’s bible and the second is the horizontal notch at the back of the plug that interfaces with the cam. During the transition period and for a while after it, a green highlighter on the cylinder and packaging label marked a modular cylinder. It appears that Schlage has since discontinued this marking; it’s been almost 10 years since the rollout after all. One final note, Classic, Primus, Everest, Primus XP, Everest 29, all keyway families are offered in the modular design.
  • Front Housing. The front housing is the same size no matter the cylinder type/size. It’s available in all finishes offered by Schlage.
  • Rear Housing. Rear housings are available to create 1-1/8”, 1-1/4”, 1-3/8”, 1-1/2”, 1-5/8”, 1-3/4” mortise cylinders. The rear housings are color coordinated in either gold or silver colors. All cylinder lengths ending in an 8th of an inch are gold, so 1-1/8” 1-3/8” and 1-5/8” rear housings are gold. 1-1/4” 1-1/2” and 1-3/4” are silver. Rim cylinder rear housings only come in one length.
  • Housing Screws. Housing screws secure the rear housing to the front housing. They are the same size no matter the cylinder size; larger rear housings just have recesses to accommodate them.
  • Cam. Cams are not interchangeable across the entire modular product line. 1-1/4”, 1-1/2”, and 1-3/4” cylinders all use one cam and 1-1/8”, 1-3/8”, and 1-5/8” cylinders use another cam. Fortunately, these sizes are marked on the back of each cam. Cams have one screw hole except the Straight Cams (L583-476 and L583-477) which contain two screw holes. The second screw hole allows the cam to be inverted, which is usually necessary on key switches.
  • Cam Screw. Cams are held in place with Torx head screws. This switch was largely influenced by customer feedback. Customers were tired of dealing with stripping issues that were common with Philips head screws.
  • Plug Extension Kit. There are two plug extension kits. The long plug extension kit is used for 1-5/8” and 1-3/4” cylinders. The short plug extension kit is used for 1-3/8” and 1-1/2” cylinders.

All modular components are available to be ordered separately.
Schlage Modular Cylinders

Identifying Schlage Modular Cylinders

The various components assist with quickly narrowing down the cylinder length without a ruler. The cam or the color of the rear housing tells you which 3 of the 6 total cylinder lengths you’re dealing with (either 1-1/8”, 1-3/8”, and 1-5/8” OR 1-1/4”, 1-1/2”, and 1-3/4”) . The length of the plug extension kit, or the lack of one, allows you to narrow the cylinder length from 3 down to 1.

Additional Information

Schlage Modular Cylinders Catalog

By |2020-01-20T09:00:57+00:00January 20th, 2020|All, Cores and Cylinders|0 Comments

'Concealed Vertical Rod' Added to 'Exit Devices' Library Section

We have moved closer towards our Exit Device ID Tool by adding the ‘Concealed Vertical Rod‘ page to our Exit Devices section in the Library. This page will focus on exit devices utilizing concealed vertical rods. At launch, we have files for the following manufacturers:

  • AdamsRite USA
  • Cal-Royal Products, Inc.
  • Corbin Russwin
  • Detex Corporation
  • Falcon
  • Hager Companies
  • International Door Closers, Inc.
  • Jackson (C.R. Laurence Co., Inc.)
  • Kaweneer Co. Inc.
  • Lawrence Hardware, Inc.
  • Marshall Best Security Corp.
  • Pamex, Inc.
  • PDQ Industries, Inc.
  • PHI Precision (dormakaba)
  • SARGENT Manufacturing Company
  • Townsteel Architectural Hardware Mfg.
  • Von Duprin
  • Yale



By |2020-01-06T09:00:56+00:00January 6th, 2020|All, Exit Devices, Library Update|0 Comments

See You In 2020!

As we enter the final stretch of 2019, we’re going to take a much needed/deserved break for the remainder of the year to tie up some loose ends and get fully prepared for 2020. We have a lot of new projects on the horizon nearing completion, such as the Exit Device ID Tool, and new partnerships to announce. We will be back Monday, January 6th with more updates and more content.
On behalf of everyone involved with LockReference.com, I want to wish you all a very Merry Christmas, a Happy Hanukkah, and a Happy New Year (and a profitable one at that!). We will see you in 2020!


By |2019-12-18T15:14:10+00:00December 18th, 2019|All|0 Comments
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