HES Smart Pac III


Here we have a HES 1006 CS in 12-hour continuous passage with more cycles. The strike was getting hot while receiving continuous power reaching temperatures in excess of 121 degrees Fahrenheit (see figure 1).
  

After purchasing and installing the HES smart pac (See figure 2) the temperature was reduced to a more reasonable temperature and has maintained function well. We recommend installing a smart pac with all heavily used access control systems, especially ones that are receiving continuous power for extended periods of time like this one being put in passage mode for hours on end. (See figure 3)

The author of this post may benefit from a commission from the use of this link.
See the link below to purchase here:

Specs from the manufacturer:

For dependable installations, add the SMART Pac III

The 2005M3 SMART Pac III is an in-line power controller that is able to receive input voltages from 12 to 32V AC or DC. It has a built-in bridge rectifier. The continuous duty timer reduces the initial voltage by 25% to extend the life of the electric strike. Includes built-in resettable fuse, MOV, voltage regulation, and input status LED.

Standard Features

  • Accepts a wide range of input voltage: 12-32 Volts AC* or DC
  • Output 12VDC or 24VDC, depending on input voltage
  • Smart LED Input Status Indicator
  • Built-in bridge rectifier
  • Built-in surge protection / voltage regulation
  • Supports fail-secure or fail-safe configured electric strikes
  • Continuous duty: reduces initial voltage by 25% after a fixed period of time, to provide cooler more efficient operation of the strike
  • Self-resetting overcurrent protection
  • Configures strike eliminating the need for voltage specific pigtails
  • Extends the warranty of HES electric strikes

Installing a SMART Pac III power controller with any new products extends the 1-year warranty on electrical components, including the SMART Pac III, to the full 3-5 warranty term applicable to each Series mechanical component as outlined in standard terms and conditions.

*Note:  For use with a 1006 electric strike, the input voltage must be a filtered DC with a ripple of less than 1 volt RMS.
**Note: The SMART Pac III can not provide an output voltage greater than the input voltage.

Here we have a He’s 1006 CS in 12 hour continuous passage more cycles. The strike was getting hot while receiving continuous power reaching temperatures in excess of 121 degrees Fahrenheit (see figure 1).

After purchasing and installing the HES smart pac (see photo 2) the temperature was reduced to a more reasonable temperature and has maintained function well.We recommend installing a smart pac with all heavily used access control systems, especially ones that are receiving continuous power for extended periods of time like this one being put in passage mode for hours on end. (See figure 3)

See link below to purchase here:
(affiliate link here)
Specs from manufacturer:

For dependable installations, add the SMART Pac III

The 2005M3 SMART Pac III is an in-line power controller that is able to receive input voltages from 12 to 32V AC or DC. It has a built-in bridge rectifier. The continuous duty timer reduces initial voltage by 25% to extend the life of the electric strike. Includes built-in resettable fuse, MOV, voltage regulation and input status LED.

Standard Features

  • Accepts wide range of input voltage: 12-32 Volts AC* or DC
  • Output 12VDC or 24VDC, depending on input voltage
  • Smart LED Input Status Indicator
  • Built-in bridge rectifier
  • Built-in surge protection / voltage regulation
  • Supports fail secure or fail safe configured electric strikes
  • Continuous duty: reduces initial voltage by 25% after a fixed period of time, to provide cooler more efficient operation of the strike
  • Self-resetting over-current protection
  • Configures strike eliminating need for voltage specific pigtails
  • Extends the warranty of HES electric strikes

Installing a SMART Pac III power controller with any new products extends the 1 year warranty on electrical components, including the SMART Pac III, to the full 3-5 warranty term applicable to each Series mechanical component as outlined in standard terms and conditions.

*Note:  For use with a 1006 electric strike, the input voltage must be a filtered DC with a ripple of less than 1 volt RMS.
**Note: The SMART Pac III can not provide an output voltage greater than the input voltage.

Electrified Locks and Exit Devices Library Update

We have updated the Electrified Locks and Exit Devices page in the Library using our new format.  We have new literature and manuals for the following manufacturers:

  • Adams Rite USA
  • Alarm Controls Corp.
  • BEST Access Systems
  • BlueWave Security
  • Corbin Russwin, Inc.
  • Detex Corporation
  • DynaLock Corporation
  • Hager Companies
  • Hikvision USA
  • HOPPE North America, Inc.
  • INTELLIKEY Corporation
  • Lawrence Hardware, Inc.
  • Locksmith Dealers of America (LSDA)
  • MARKS USA
  • R.R. Brink Locking Systems, Inc.
  • ROFU Security International Corporation
  • SARGENT Manufacturing Company
  • Schlage
  • Seco-Larm USA, Inc.
  • Security Door Controls (SDC)
  • Southern Folger
  • Von Duprin
By |2019-07-12T09:00:00+00:00July 12th, 2019|All, Electrified Locks and Exit Devices|Comments Off on Electrified Locks and Exit Devices Library Update

Testing Electrified Hardware with 9V Batteries

Very often I, and anyone else that dabbles in access control, get called to troubleshoot problems with an access control system. Whatever the symptoms, the usual checklist of diagnosing the problem(s) includes things like checking for continuity, proper voltage and amperage, integrity of splices, etc. There have been times where everything seems to check out and the only thing that hasn’t been tested is that electrified door hardware itself. This could be an electric strike or an electrified panic device, for example.
Now I know what some of you may be thinking: if it’s getting the proper voltage and amperage it’s obviously the electrified door hardware that’s the problem. Fair point and nearly always true. When diagnosing something like a stuck solenoid or a solenoid plunger that needs adjustment on, say, a Von Duprin panic device with an EL or QEL kit, it can be very problematic to constantly swipe or read a card to send voltage/amperage to the electrified door hardware while diagnosing and/or adjusting it. This is especially true if you’re trying to observe or position a multimeter or pay close attention to something in particular, such as inrush current. Examples abound for the benefit of a makeshift power supply in the field when troubleshooting access control components.
This need doesn’t arise all that often but when it does it’s helpful to know that you can create one of these makeshift power supplies with nothing more than scrap wire and a 9 volt battery, or two.
Note: Keep in mind that this is only for DC powered electrified door hardware.

Basic 9V Circuit(s)

Let’s start by recapping electrified door hardware basics as they relate to our situation. A vast majority operate on either 12 or 24V. Some operate on 16V or 18V and while these are outliers the methods discussed below can still be utilized to diagnose them.
If you are diagnosing electrified door hardware operating on 12V, a 9V battery is enough to test it. I have yet to encounter any 12V electrified door hardware that won’t operate when connected to a fully charged 9V battery. If the electrified door hardware operates on 16, 18, or 24V you will need two 9V batteries connected in series.
If you’re unfamiliar with wiring batteries together, here is brief summary:

  1. Two batteries wired in series combines their voltage.
  2. Two batteries wired in parallel combines their amperage.

By wiring two 9V batteries in series we essentially get a 18V battery (the makeshift power supply). And some of you might be saying, “that’s not enough for 24V!” It’s never not worked for me. If you run across the unicorn I’m still looking for, just add another 9V in series for 27V.

Wiring 9V Batteries

The positive and negative terminals are clearly marked on 9V batteries; the bigger of the two is negative (anode), the smaller positive (cathode).

To wire a battery in series, you connect the positive terminal of one battery to the negative terminal of the other. The remaining positive and negative terminal then become your positive and negative leads, which you connect to the electrified door hardware. It’s that simple.

In a pinch, you can cut wire for the connections and tape them in place. If you diagnose access control systems/components regularly I would highly advise you to grab a pair of snap connectors (they can be salvaged from electronic equipment or purchased at Radio Shack or Frys for less than $2 each) and wire them in series so that you don’t have to cut and splice and tape every time you want to use this makeshift power supply; they’re also much more reliable. I also solder the tips of the leads to keep the wires from fraying or breaking. You could buy clips or probes instead and attach them if you desired. Up to you; no right or wrong answer.

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